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Author Topic: Workaround for wireless problems  (Read 3182 times)

tb2496

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  • Posts: 2
Workaround for wireless problems
« on: November 26, 2009, 07:28:45 AM »

seems like everyone else here I've had the same problem with my wireless not working after some time, especially when I resumed my laptop from standby.

I changed my TCP/IP settings on the laptop and instead of obtaining IP and DNS automatically (through DHCP from the router) I assigned them manually.  this way the connection seems more stable, so maybe instead of getting dropped every day it might happen once a week....

I have WBR-1310 rev B.
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chris07

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Re: Workaround for wireless problems
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2010, 06:19:27 AM »

where do we get the ip and dns numbers to enter manually?
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bjrichus

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  • Posts: 119
Re: Workaround for wireless problems
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2010, 07:08:34 AM »

where do we get the ip and dns numbers to enter manually?

The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) reserved the following three blocks of the IP address space for private LAN use (local networks):

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255
 
Also, IP addresses in the range of 169.254.0.0 -169.254.255.255 are reserved for Automatic Private IP Addressing.

This means the above three blocks of addresses are only to be used on your LAN at home and should not be used on the wider Internet.

I usually use 192.168.0.1, 192.168.0.2, etc. and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 when assigning static IP addresses to computers on a small Local Area Networks (LANs).  If a DHCP server is also on the LAN it's scope (range of IP addresses that it can assign to computers on the LAN set to obtain their IP addresses automatically) should be adjusted so it does not interfere with locally assigned static IP addresses.

Check out the manual for your specific router, it's all in there (or should be somewhere), but note also that different router makers use IP ranges that may well be different from the usual for DLINK, who have tended to use the 192.168.0.1 and up range. For example, Linksys tend to start at 192.168.1.1 - so it does vary a little from one maker to another.

Of course, the information for the WAN connection is not the same and will depend on your ISP and what they happen to assign for you.

 ;D

« Last Edit: January 06, 2010, 07:15:26 AM by bjrichus »
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