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Author Topic: Static Routing  (Read 2024 times)

Kaiyn_Fallanx

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Static Routing
« on: September 24, 2018, 07:07:38 AM »

Hi!

I'm not sure if this is the correct avenue but I need some help.

I had set up the DSR-250 on our data network to communicate with the phone network on a Cisco router. The static routes have already been mapped.

The data network internal IP range is
192.168.0.0 /24

The phone network internal IP range is
192.168.200.0 /24

From the phone network I can ping the gateway which is the DSR-250 router. The gateway IP is 192.168.0.1 and is assigned to the DSR-250. However if I use one of the clients from within the data network to ping the phone network data is not passing through.

Here is the static routing table. I was wondering if I missed something or if something is missing.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2018, 07:30:25 AM by Kaiyn_Fallanx »
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FurryNutz

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    • Router Troubleshooting
Re: Static Routing
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2018, 08:19:12 AM »

Link>Welcome!

  • What Hardware version is your router? Look at sticker under the router case.
  • Link>What Firmware version is currently loaded? Found on the routers web page under status.
  • What region are you located?

Is there any Static Routing information in the user manual?
Is the DSR connected to any Ethernet switches ? Mfr and model if any?
What is the model of the Cisco router?
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Kaiyn_Fallanx

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Re: Static Routing
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2018, 08:33:32 AM »

    What Hardware version is your router? Look at sticker under the router case. A4 (Canada)
   What Firmware version is currently loaded? Found on the routers web page under status. 3.11B202E_WW
    What region are you located? North America


Is there any Static Routing information in the user manual? Yes, and it's very basic
Is the DSR connected to any Ethernet switches ? Mfr and model if any? No. The connection is between the DSR-250 router and the Cisco switch
What is the model of the Cisco router?  Not sure as this was provided by the phone company.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2018, 08:35:24 AM by Kaiyn_Fallanx »
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PacketTracer

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Re: Static Routing
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2018, 03:10:05 PM »

Hi,

unfortunately I'm not able to make head or tail of what your scenario exactly might be.

Is it something like this (A)?:


                         .---------.                              .--------------.
|---- 192.168.0.0/24 ----| DSR-250 |---- some unknown network ----| Cisco router |---- 192.168.200.0/24 ----|
                        /`---------                              `--------------\
                       /                                                           \
                 192.168.0.1                                                  192.168.200.1



Or is it something like that (B)?:


                         .---------.                          .--------------.
|---- 192.168.0.0/24 ----| DSR-250 |---- 192.168.200.0/24 ----| Cisco router |---- other networks ...
                        /`---------\                         `--------------
                       /             \
                 192.168.0.1    192.168.200.1



Or is it something else?

Quote
From the phone network I can ping the gateway which is the DSR-250 router. The gateway IP is 192.168.0.1 and is assigned to the DSR-250.

I guess you mean, you have some PC (not a phone) plugged to the phone network (or you use the Cisco router's CLI) and can ping the address 192.168.0.1, that is DSR-250's "far side"? Can you also ping any other device 192.168.0.X (X other than 1) of your data network?

The static routing table shown is the Cisco's or DSR-250's table?

In any case it looks strange, because any destination entry 192.168.200.X/255.255.255.0 (X other than 0) is equivalent to the single destination 192.168.200.0/24 (that is the whole phone network). The same is true for 192.168.0.X/255.255.255.0 (X other than 0) which always means the same destination 192.168.0.0/24 (the whole data network). Did you configure these entries or where they somehow learned dynamically?

In addition this routing table neither matches scenario A nor scenario B.

PT

« Last Edit: September 24, 2018, 03:14:52 PM by PacketTracer »
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Kaiyn_Fallanx

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Re: Static Routing
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2018, 08:02:08 AM »

Hi everyone. Sorry if I wasn't clear.

So the set up is like this.

DSR 250 has an internal ip of 192.168.0.0 /24 which is connected directly to the Cisco router via one of the LAN ports on the back. The Cisco router has an internal ip of 192.168.200.0 /24

So technically the first diagram by PacketTracer is the current set up except that both routers are connected directly.

The routing table shown is the routing table on the DSR 250. Unfortunately from either the data network or the phone network the only thing that could be pinged is the gateway IP. Which is 192.168.0.1 for the DSR 250 and 192.168.200.1 for the Cisco router.
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PacketTracer

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Re: Static Routing
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2018, 02:36:30 PM »

Hi again,

Quote
DSR 250 has an internal ip of 192.168.0.0 /24 which is connected directly to the Cisco router via one of the LAN ports on the back. The Cisco router has an internal ip of 192.168.200.0 /24

So technically the first diagram by PacketTracer is the current set up except that both routers are connected directly.

Sorry, but this still doesn't make any sense to me:

Did you really connect a LAN port of the DSR-250 (that is a port that belongs to network 192.168.0.0/24) to a LAN port of the Cisco router (that is a port that belongs to 192.168.200.0/24)? Sorry to say so, but if true, that would be quite useless ...

If you want to connect your data network to the phone network you wouldn't even need a second router (the DSR-250). Depending on the capabilties of the Cisco router alone you would configure a second LAN interface on it for your data network and connect it to the switch used for the data network (you could possibly do this via two IP subnetwork interfaces on a single LAN port of the Cisco router using to VLANs and a VLAN trunk port on a single switch, that carries both phone and data network via the two VLANs). The Cisco router alone would then route between both networks.

PT
« Last Edit: September 25, 2018, 02:43:07 PM by PacketTracer »
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Kaiyn_Fallanx

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Re: Static Routing
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2018, 07:19:39 AM »

Thanks for accommodating my mundane questions PacketTracer.

The thing is the phone network has it's own internet connect vice versa the data network runs on BELL's static IP and yes, you are correct about the both routers being connected via the LAN port. VLAN could be an option.

Currently at wits end.  :'(
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PacketTracer

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Re: Static Routing
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2018, 12:52:15 PM »

Hi once more,

what about the following solution (similar to scenario B mentioned earlier) ?:


  .---.                                   .---.     
  | C | DG = 192.168.0.1                  | P |  DG = 192.168.200.254         DG --> INTERNET
  `---                                   `---                                :
    |                                       |                                  :
    |                          no NAT!      |                                  v              .--------.
    |                        .---------.    |                          .--------------.      (          )
|---+---- 192.168.0.0/24 ----| DSR-250 |----+---- 192.168.200.0/24 ----| Cisco router |---- (  INTERNET  )
                            /`---------\                             /`--------------      (          )
                           /             \                           /         ^              `--------
                     192.168.0.1    192.168.200.1            192.168.200.254   :
                       LAN-Port        WAN-Port                                :
                                                                               :
                                                                               :
                                                                               :
                                                        route: 192.168.0.0/24 next hop 192.168.200.1


Given the following prerequesites ...
  • You have admin access to the Cisco router and can configure an IP route on it (otherwise see *WORKAROUND below).
  • The WAN port of the DSR-250 is not in use to date and you can switch off NAT for routed IP packets from LAN to WAN (& vice versa).

... you could do the following:

  • Connect the WAN port of the DSR-250 to a LAN port of the Cisco router (or to a port of a switch used for the phone net).
  • Given the address 192.168.200.1 is not in use within the phone net configure the WAN port of the DSR-250 to have the address 192.168.200.1/255.255.255.0 without any default gateway.
  • For the DSR-250 switch off NAT between LAN and WAN.
  • While the phones P have their default gateway DG configured to be 192.168.200.254 (or rather the Cisco router's LAN address), they don't know anything about your data net 192.168.0.0/24 and that it is reachable via the next hop 192.168.200.1 (the DSR's WAN adddress). Hence you have to configure a route within the Cisco router (destination 192.168.0.0/24 next hop 192.168.200.1) so it can route packets from the phones destined for your data net on their behalf.

In addition if you configure the DSR's WAN port to have default gateway (DG) 192.168.200.254 (or rather the Cisco router's LAN address), the clients C within you data net can utilize the Cisco router's Internet access (but may be the phone provider blocks traffic other than phone protocols such like SIP or RTP).

*WORKAROUND: If you don't have admin access to the Cisco router (and hence cannot configure the required route on it) you can use the following workaround instead (the drawback of this is that the data net's clients can't utilize the Cisco router's Internet access):
  • Reconfigure the phones to use the default gateway 192.168.200.1 (the IP address of the DSR's WAN interface).
  • Configure the DSR's WAN port to have default gateway (DG) 192.168.200.254 (or rather the IP address of the Cisco router's LAN interface).

WORKAROUND:

  .---.                                   .---.     
  | C | DG = 192.168.0.1                  | P |  DG = 192.168.200.1           DG --> INTERNET
  `---                                   `---                                :
    |                                       |                                  :
    |                          no NAT!      |                                  v              .--------.
    |                        .---------.    |                          .--------------.      (          )
|---+---- 192.168.0.0/24 ----| DSR-250 |----+---- 192.168.200.0/24 ----| Cisco router |---- (  INTERNET  )
                            /`---------\                             /`--------------      (          )
                           /      ^      \                           /                        `--------
                     192.168.0.1  :  192.168.200.1           192.168.200.254
                       LAN-Port   :    WAN-Port
                                  :
                                  :
                                  :
                         DG = 192.168.200.254


In the WORKAROUND scenario the phones always route outgoing traffic to the DSR which then routes it either to the data net or to the Internet depending on the traffic's destination addresses. In contrast incoming Internet traffic is alway destined to the phones and transmitted directly to them. Clients in the data net cannot use the Internet because the Cisco router does not know (due to the missing route) how to reach network 192.168.0.0/24.

PT
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 05:19:17 AM by PacketTracer »
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