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Author Topic: DGS-1210-10P  (Read 2081 times)

lenardd

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DGS-1210-10P
« on: June 11, 2018, 09:36:45 PM »

Hi All,

I'm kind of new at this....

I have a 1210-10p and would like to modify the following setup https://eu.dlink.com/uk/en/support/faq/switches/layer-2-gigabit/dgs-series/es_dgs-1210_como-configurar-voice-vlan so that the phones have access to the router for DHCP and internet I'm basically trying imitate this setup: https://www.tp-link.com/us/faq-2148.html .

Thanks in advance for any help.

--Lenard

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FurryNutz

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2018, 09:30:32 AM »

Link>Welcome!

  • What Hardware version is your router? Look at sticker under the router case.
  • Link>What Firmware version is currently loaded? Found on the routers web page under status.
  • What region are you located?

You might check out the user manual for any help and information...
What is the Mfr and model# of the ISP Modem and main host router your using with the switch?
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"Nothing Funny about It...." We are not here to Impress anyone! You have a be a COMPETENT user first to under stand COMPETENT help!

lenardd

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2018, 02:03:33 PM »

Hi There,

The cable modem router is a Hitron CGNM-2250.
Hardware Version   1A
Software Version   4.5.11.9.1

The dlink switch is:
Device Type   DGS-1210-10P   
Boot Version   1.00.016   
Firmware Version   4.10.004   
Hardware Version   C1

I'm located in Canada.
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PacketTracer

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2018, 03:59:48 AM »

Hi Lenard,

I'm not sure if you have (1) phone/PC pairs sharing a single switchport (as seen behind your first link) or (2) phones and PCs plugged into separate switch ports (as seen behind your second link) or (3) a combination of both.

But no matter what - in any case you end up with two VLANs and hence two IP networks, one for voice and one for data.

Hence, the features of your router play a key role: Usually the router will serve only one IP network at the LAN site and route (and NAT) the IP packets with private source addresses to the Internet. But in your case, your router should have to serve two LAN site private networks (one for voice and one for data) - that is, it should have to provide either two LAN-site Ethernet ports that can be isolated from each other and configured for two different IP networks - or a single LAN-site Ethernet port that can be configured for two vlan-aware subinterfaces, each one serving a different IP network.

If I look at your router model, unfortunately I can't see, that it provides such a feature.

So, if your router can serve only one IP network, a solution has to be found that combines two VLANs in a way, that they can share a single IP network. The easiest (and perhaps only) solution I can see in the moment is to bridge both VLANs in the following way: Within your switch you configure two access ports, one for the voice VLAN and one for the data VLAN, and then you connect these two ports via a cable. Of course, while technically feasible, the disadvantage of this (workaround) solution is that it consumes two switch ports for the bridge cable and that any prioritization of voice frames inside the switch gets lost as soon as they have passed over to the data VLAN.

Even more simple: If (2) meets your scenario you could even forget anything about a separate voice VLAN and simply plug your phones to the switch in the same way you connect PCs. The workaround solution I suggested is only needed in cases (1) or (3).

To say it the other way round: If prioritization of voice is an absolute demand, you can't help to handle voice within a separate and prioritized voice VLAN (and IP network) throughout the switch and even beyond: For example your router should prioritize voice appropriately, and ideally voice frames should be transmitted to the router via a seperate/dedicated link. This means you would have to purchase another router, that provides the required features (second LAN network for voice, voice prioritization within the router and for the communication to the Internet).

The somewhat annoying thing behind the scenarios your referred to via the two web links is that they only tell half the truth in favor of a restricted view that fits some praised product feature but ignores the following obvious questions (they cannot provide a solution for):

first link: And how can I connect the two VLANs to my router and to the Internet respectively?
second link: And what about the PC at port Gi1/0/3? It's obviously isolated and can't talk to the router/Internet (only the phones can do).

PT
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 07:00:29 AM by PacketTracer »
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lenardd

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2018, 08:40:59 AM »

PacketTracer,

Thank you so much for taking the time to reply to my post.  Yes, I would like to prioritize voice data over all other data on my home network.

The phones that I was going to be using are these.  As you can see, the base package includes a wireless base which handles multiple handsets so I would only be using 1 port on the switch. More documentation is available here. The cable modem router would handle the DHCP stuff.

What do you think of this idea....what if, instead of using the "voice vlan" feature of the DGS-1210 switch, I enable the Asymmetric VLANs option and configure it to share the cable modem router port across vlans? I would use QoS feature to prioritize the traffic to the router port. Would that work? I currently have some wireless traffic on the router but I would move it to a wireless AP plugged into the switch so it could also get prioritized.

--Lenard
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PacketTracer

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2018, 09:26:08 AM »

Hi again,

yes, configuring asymmetric VLANs was the other idea I had in mind either - but I was in doubt, if the VLAN used for voice in that case could be simultaneously defined to be a voice vlan (to get it prioritized inside the switch). Your idea to use QoS is only useful for the router uplink but not for prioritizing voice traffic inside the switch.

But anyway, your idea might work, so give it a try (I mean: asymmetric VLANs + Voice VLAN, not asymmetric VLANs instead of Voice VLAN).

PT

<EDIT>Sometimes the obvious ideas last longest... Just connect the DECT base station to another free LAN port of the router and leave the switch aside. In this case you can restrict any concerns about prioritization of voice to the router.</EDIT>
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 09:51:34 AM by PacketTracer »
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lenardd

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2018, 05:47:13 PM »

PacketTracer,

>> your idea might work, so give it a try (I mean: asymmetric VLANs + Voice VLAN,
>> not asymmetric VLANs instead of Voice VLAN).

I had tried that before posting but you can't have both enabled.  It is one or the other.

>> Just connect the DECT base station to another free LAN port of the router and leave
>> the switch aside. In this case you can restrict any concerns about prioritization of voice to the router.

There is no prioritization options available on the Hitron cable router that I can see.

I don't know....it would seem the best course of action is to set the cable modem router to "IP Passthrough" and get a better 3rd party router. I thought I could make use of the switch somehow but it doesn't look like it.  :)

--Lenard
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PacketTracer

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Re: DGS-1210-10P
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 01:54:02 AM »

I think it becomes increasingly harder to integrate more and more techniques (telephony, DECT base, modem, Wifi, router, firewalling, IPv6, ... ) usually used within home network environments by combining particular solutions of different vendors - maybe it's better to buy a router that integrates all that stuff in a single box.
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