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Author Topic: Does Wi-Fi work with Windows XP?  (Read 1487 times)
casilversurfr
Level 1 Member
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Posts: 1


« on: July 21, 2009, 03:59:52 PM »

Hello,

I recently purchased the D-LINK DIR-655 Xtreme N Gigabit Router and the D-LINK DWA-652 Xtreme N Notebook Cardbus Apater.

Wi-Fi is enabled on the Router, by default.

My wired desktop successfully connects to the router and I'm accessing the internet.

During the installation of the Notebook Cardbus Adapter I was prompted to either Manually connect to the router or automatically connect using either the Wi-Fi Pin or Push Button. I tried both the Pin and Push Button and made sure on the side of the Router that I pushed the sync button for the Wi-Fi. I also Pushed the button from the Router's UI and in all cases I could not connect to the Router. I ended up Manually specifying the Router info in order to connect to the router using the security WPA-Personal. In speaking with the D-LINK Support engineer I was told that Wi-Fi is supported for Vista but not Windows XP. Is this true? My laptop that I'm trying to connect wirelessly has Windows XP Home Edition SP3.

I was also told that Wi-Fi is not a security feature but simply an easier way to wirelessly connect wireless devices to your Router. So much for that. I was thinking Wi-Fi might be another layer of security over WPA-Personal. With my Netgear router I was specifically able to add the MAC address of those machines that I wanted to have access to the Router. Nothing is more secure than this. Maybe there is a way to do that with this router that I have not found. In my Wireless settings I have set my wireless router as invisible.





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jason1722x
Level 3 Member
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Posts: 284


« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009, 05:37:34 PM »

Hello,

I recently purchased the D-LINK DIR-655 Xtreme N Gigabit Router and the D-LINK DWA-652 Xtreme N Notebook Cardbus Apater.

Wi-Fi is enabled on the Router, by default.

My wired desktop successfully connects to the router and I'm accessing the internet.

During the installation of the Notebook Cardbus Adapter I was prompted to either Manually connect to the router or automatically connect using either the Wi-Fi Pin or Push Button. I tried both the Pin and Push Button and made sure on the side of the Router that I pushed the sync button for the Wi-Fi. I also Pushed the button from the Router's UI and in all cases I could not connect to the Router. I ended up Manually specifying the Router info in order to connect to the router using the security WPA-Personal. In speaking with the D-LINK Support engineer I was told that Wi-Fi is supported for Vista but not Windows XP. Is this true? My laptop that I'm trying to connect wirelessly has Windows XP Home Edition SP3.

I was also told that Wi-Fi is not a security feature but simply an easier way to wirelessly connect wireless devices to your Router. So much for that. I was thinking Wi-Fi might be another layer of security over WPA-Personal. With my Netgear router I was specifically able to add the MAC address of those machines that I wanted to have access to the Router. Nothing is more secure than this. Maybe there is a way to do that with this router that I have not found. In my Wireless settings I have set my wireless router as invisible.






Go into the router setup and temporary change to visible mode and go to Advanced-->Wi-Fi Protected Setup and uncheck "Enable". You should be able to connect then, put your MAC in or adjust your Security settings. Then re-enable the Wi-Fi Protected Setup.
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Msradell
Level 1 Member
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Posts: 20


« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 05:46:23 PM »

I'm trying to figure out the statement that WiFi is not a security feature?  It's also not an easier way to connect wirelessly, It is the way to connect wirelessly.  WiFi is a communications protocol, nothing more, nothing less.  The securities features are just a part of the protocol, and come in many forms.  Using the PIN and the push button are just different ways of setting up the security.  I personally prefer to do it manually, it's just as easy (possibly easier) and you're sure of what's happening.  Sounds like the person at D-Link was also confused on this subject.
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jason1722x
Level 3 Member
***
Posts: 284


« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009, 07:02:29 PM »

I'm trying to figure out the statement that WiFi is not a security feature?  It's also not an easier way to connect wirelessly, It is the way to connect wirelessly.  WiFi is a communications protocol, nothing more, nothing less.  The securities features are just a part of the protocol, and come in many forms.  Using the PIN and the push button are just different ways of setting up the security.  I personally prefer to do it manually, it's just as easy (possibly easier) and you're sure of what's happening.  Sounds like the person at D-Link was also confused on this subject.
"WiFi is a communications protocol, nothing more, nothing less." you said it all.
"The securities features are just a part of the protocol, and come in many forms. " This is where I believe you are mistaken.
WiFi is communications protocal. Security is different.
Make it simple.
Example:
The keys to your car is the security, has nothing to do with how it runs, it just enables it to or not run.
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