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Author Topic: ipv6  (Read 12054 times)

cronraptor

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ipv6
« on: December 05, 2013, 07:52:32 PM »

I've noted that ipv6 is now going through my ISP and out into the wide world.  I'd like to set up the router properly for ipv6 (address assignment, security, etc) but I know nothing and the router help is too brief.  Is there a good tutorial on setting up the router for ipv6 or, failing that, a good general ipv6 tutorial.

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FurryNutz

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2013, 07:18:31 AM »

Try walking thru the IPv6 setup wizard to connect it? It should help you set up the router generally.

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cronraptor

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2013, 12:35:36 PM »

Try walking thru the IPv6 setup wizard to connect it? It should help you set up the router generally.

   Doesn't seem to work, at least in terms of walking me through anything.  All it did was tell me to reboot the router.  However, I now show an IPV6 connection with my ISP, which it did not before.

   Now I just need to figure out what all the various settings MEAN to see if they're right for my internal network (e.g. setting up automatic assignination of ipv6 addresses, etc).
« Last Edit: December 07, 2013, 12:38:16 PM by cronraptor »
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cronraptor

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2013, 01:37:05 PM »

Looks like I have my first specific question ...

IPV6 doesn't work like IPV4 vis a vis the whole concept of routing, NATting and virtual serving.  The IPV6 address assigned to your device is globally routable.

I don't want my computers accessible outside the router, except for specific ports.  In IPV4 all incoming traffic is blocked by the router, except for those ports (such as for your web server) you set up in the router as virtual servers.

How does one do this in IPV6 land?  The router documentation isn't helpful in this regard.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2013, 01:38:36 PM by cronraptor »
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PacketTracer

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2013, 02:05:35 PM »

Hi cronraptor,

Quote
IPV6 doesn't work like IPV4 vis a vis the whole concept of routing, NATting and virtual serving.  The IPV6 address assigned to your device is globally routable.

I don't want my computers accessible outside the router, except for specific ports.  In IPV4 all incoming traffic is blocked by the router, except for those ports (such as for your web server) you set up in the router as virtual servers.

How does one do this in IPV6 land?  The router documentation isn't helpful in this regard.

Welcome to the world of IPv6! That's why you need an IPv6 firewall built into your DIR-655. Unfortunately I don't know if your model according to hardware revison an firmware version has one. If it has one it should look similar to the DIR-657 which is shown here for hardware version A1 and firmware version 1.00NA.

But the more probable is that there is no firewall available for your DIR-655 (just as with my older DIR-825 hardware version B1). The only solution in this case is to protect your hosts within your LAN via host firewalls or to buy a new router which has a builtin IPv6 firewall.

PacketTracer

Edit: According to pages 74 of both the user manuals for hw version A (ftp://ftp2.dlink.com/PRODUCTS/DIR-655/REVA/DIR-655_REVA_MANUAL_2.30_EN.PDF) and B (ftp://ftp2.dlink.com/PRODUCTS/DIR-655/REVB/DIR-655_REVB_MANUAL_V2.30_EN.PDF) you should have an IPv6 firewall, hence you should switch in on and configure it according to your needs (see for example this discussion).
« Last Edit: December 07, 2013, 02:47:54 PM by PacketTracer »
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cronraptor

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2013, 06:41:52 AM »

Thanks, this is the kind of information I'm looking for.  I'll let the forum know how things go.

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cronraptor

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2013, 10:11:40 AM »

I wish my grandparents were still alive so I could tell them "I get it" regarding their general grumpiness toward people.  The older I get, the more exasperated I get as I see the same things over and over.

Why should developers not write documentation?  To wit:

Enable Automatic DHCP-PD in LAN: check to enable automatic DHCP-PD in LAN

I could figure that out for myself ... what I can't figure out is what this setting ACCOMPLISHES.  I've figured out what DHCP-PD means via the googleweb, but I can't figure out what the application of it is in this case and therefore what this setting does.  Anybody know?
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FurryNutz

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2013, 11:52:14 AM »

Wiki:
IPv6
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PacketTracer

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2013, 02:20:46 PM »

Hi cronraptor,

to help you a bit:

"IPv6 CONNECTION TYPE: My IPv6 Connection is:" Look what is configured for your IPv4 Internet access and configure the same for IPv6, given your ISP uses the same mechanisms for both protocols, hence:

IPv4=Static IP --> IPv6=Static IPv6 (Ask your ISP for the data to be entered in this case)
IPv4=Dynamic IP --> IPv6=Autoconfiguration (SLAAC/DHCPv6)
IPv4=PPPoE (Username/Password) --> IPv6 (PPPoE)

Other IPv6 Connections (e.g. IPv6 in IPv4 tunnel, 6rd) are tunneling techniques, where IPv6 packets get routed to the IPv6-Internet by encapsulating them into IPv4 packets, but since your ISP seems to offer native IPv6 access, only one of the above listed choices is adequate.

In case of PPPoE you have to decide, if IPv6 and IPv4 packets shall be forwarded through the same PPP connection to your ISP (default=Share with IPv4), or if your ISP supports/demands a second PPP connection for use with IPv6 ("Create a new session"). In the second case you have to specify the PPP credentials for the second PPP connection (as assigned by your ISP). A second choice with PPPoE has to be made for Address Mode=Dynamic IP (default) or =Static IP (then to be entered into the field "IP Address"). The address of concern is the IPv6 address to be used at the WAN interface of your box and corresponds to the global IPv4 address your box gets assigned (with the difference that the IPv6 WAN address is not used for NAT, there is no NAT for IPv6).

IPv6 DNS SETTINGS:
Your ISP should provide them automatically, hence default option "Obtain a DNS server address automatically" is right, otherwise select option "Use the following DNS address" and enter the data you are told by your provider.  It doesn't matter if you haven't configured IPv6 DNS server addresses at all because names can also be resolved to IPv6 addresses by asking your configured IPv4 DNS server addresses via IPv4, in other words: IPv6 name resolution also works by asking DNS servers via IPv4 transport.

LAN IPv6 ADDRESS SETTINGS:
As there is no NAT for IPv6, within your LAN you need an IPv6 address range that is globally routable. In general, this address range is independent/different from the IPv6 address range, your WAN IPv6 address stems from. There are two possible methods to get this IPv6 range for use inside your LAN:

(1) Activate DHCP-PD (PD=Prefix Delegation, in IPv6 the term "Prefix" specifies an IPv6 address range of some size) which is the default: In this case your router asks your ISP via DHCP-PD for an IPv6 address range and uses it for IPv6 autoconfiguration inside your LAN.

(2) If your Provider does not support DHCP-PD, you have to enter the IPv6 address range (ask your ISP for the value) manually into the field called "LAN IPv6 Address": This is a value of the form XXXX:XXXX:XXXX:XXXX:: where any X is one of 0, 1, 2, ... 9, a, b, ..., f (a hex digit, you may also use A, B, ..., F), and it is not the address of the router's LAN interface but the network address of the entire LAN (just as 192.168.1.0/24 is not an IPv4 address of a single host but for the entire network including the addresses 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254 and 192.168.1.255 beeing the broadcast address). That's why this address ends with "::" meaning all 0 in the lower 64 bits of the address. The router's LAN interface address is formed automatically from this range and the LAN-MAC address of the router.

ADDRESS AUTOCONFIGURATION SETTINGS:
Best choice is to activate "Enable automatic IPv6 address assignment :" which is the default. This means that your router either operates as DHCPv6 server and/or regularly or in response to a solicitation from an IPv6 client multicasts the LAN IPv6 address (the IPv6 prefix XXXX:XXXX:XXXX:XXXX::/64) into your LAN (so called router advertisements RA), so that all LAN clients can automatically form their own IPv6 host addresses by appending a value (derived from their unique MAC addresses) into the lower 64 bits of the prefix. They also learn the IPv6 default gateway which is the "link local address (fe80::...)" shown in the area "LAN IPv6 ADDRESS SETTINGS :" and is the address the RAs are send from.

If you disable "Enable automatic IPv6 address assignment :" you have to configure all your hosts within your LAN manually - impossible, if you don't know the LAN prefix to use in advance or because it dynamically changes via DHCP-PD according to a privacy policy of your ISP.

As long as you have only one LAN behind your box and no additional routers inside you LAN that connect to further inside LANs, you should deactivate "Enable Automatic DHCP-PD in LAN". With this option enabled another internal router could ask your box for an IPv6 prefix to use for the next LAN this internal router connects to. But this is advanced and not needed in more than 99% of all cases.

Leave the "Router Advertisement Lifetime :" as specified and finally select the proper Autoconfiguration Type:

SLAAC+RDNSS:
This means that LAN clients autoconfigure themselves (SLAAC=Stateless Address Auto Configuration) by evaluating Router Advertisements (RA) and hence learn their host address, prefix length (always 64) an default gateway. In addition the IPv6 DNS servers to use are learned from RDNSS, which means that their addresses are conveyed within RAs, too. But be careful: Up to now, most clients (such as Windows 7) do not support RDNSS, so it is better to select the next choice:

SLAAC+stateless DHCPv6 (default):
Same as before, but now the clients ask your router via DHCP information requests for the values of IPv6 DNS servers. This is the preferred choice, because this type of autoconfiguration is supported by most clients.

Stateful DHCPv6:
In this case clients use RAs only to learn a default gateway and the IPv6 prefixes active on the link, but they use DHCPv6 to learn their IPv6 address and the IPv6 DNS servers. Here you have to specify an address range (start - end), the clients get an offer from.

IPV6 FIREWALL:
As long as it is switched off, any IPv6 traffic inside <---> outside is blocked, in other words: you can't use the IPv6 Internet. Hence:

(1) Switch FW on via "Turn IPv6 Firewall ON and ALLOW rules listed"
(2) Specify a single rule that allows anything going out:

- Activate the checkbox of the first rule
- Give it a Name, e.g. "AllowAllOut"
- Schedule = Always
- Source Interface = LAN
- Source IP Address Range = ::
- Protocol = Any
- Dest Interface = WAN
- Dest IP Address Range = ::
- Port Range: leave as is, not relevant (=any value) for Protocol = Any

PacketTracer

EDIT:

After you have managed to bring it up, at one of your LAN hosts do the following:

- Switch off a host based firewall (e.g. Windows firewall) if one is active on the selected host.
- Visit "http://ipv6.chappell-family.com/ipv6tcptest/" and perform a portscan test to see that your host is protected behind the IPv6 firewall of your DIR-box.
- Switch on host based firewall again.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 02:41:27 PM by PacketTracer »
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FurryNutz

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2013, 06:35:15 PM »

Such epic novels PT.  ::)
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cronraptor

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #10 on: December 25, 2013, 07:12:55 AM »

"IPv6 CONNECTION TYPE: My IPv6 Connection is:" Look what is configured for your IPv4 Internet access and configure the same for IPv6, given your ISP uses the same mechanisms for both protocols, hence:

...etc

   Thanks for the post it was a big help.  One thing to note ... apparently the ipv6 firewall works in conjunction with the Simple Security setting as well as independently, and the router behaves differently based on the combinations.  I ended up needing to use both Simple Security and firewall rules to get things working the way I needed.

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PacketTracer

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Re: ipv6
« Reply #11 on: December 25, 2013, 08:10:58 AM »

Quote
One thing to note ... apparently the ipv6 firewall works in conjunction with the Simple Security setting as well as independently, and the router behaves differently based on the combinations.  I ended up needing to use both Simple Security and firewall rules to get things working the way I needed.

See this lengthy discussion where network1027 and I tried to figure out how "Simple Security" works. One of our findings was:

... when combined with enabled "Simple Security"...

  • In firewall mode DENY, in general rules for direction WAN-->LAN are useless because in this direction all unsolicited traffic (except ICMPv6 traffic allowed due to RFC4890) is blocked anyway by enabled "Simple Security" (as you said: "IPv6 Simple Security blocks incoming Wan, wether the firewall mode is OFF, ALLOW, or DENY"). Hence any rule should only be defined for direction LAN-->WAN and is then useful to disallow some specific traffic going out unrestricted otherwise. A rule for WAN-->LAN would only be useful for denying some ICMPv6 types that are allowed via enabled "Simple Security" according to RFC4890.
  • The firewall mode ALLOW works almost the same as in case when "Simple Security" is switched off except that ICMPv6 rules according to RFC4890 are in place when combined with enabled "Simple Security".

But of course it would be more helpful if D-Link engineers described the effects of this firewall setting within a good product documentation instead of leaving the users guess about it, especially in reference to such a security critical feature.
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