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Author Topic: Windows 7 and DNS-323 connection issues  (Read 9536 times)
xardion
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« on: November 12, 2011, 02:17:59 AM »

I am running Win 7 Home Premium (32bit on my desktop and 64bit on my laptop) and I am having the same issue with both computers.  I set a static IP for the DNS-323 (firmware 1.09) and I can see it using the easy search utility.  Also, my PS3 can steam media from the NAS with no problems as well.  My problem is with computers, I am not always able to access the drive.  I can ping the IP from both computers, and I can log into the device page from both computers as well, but I am not always able to see the device in My Network or go to \\dlink.  Any ideas on what is wrong?  The weird thing is that most of the time I am not able to connect, but for sometimes I can connect.  I did not change any settings, so I am not sure why I am able to connect sometimes, but not others.  With the PS3 I am always able to connect.
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Steve Pitts
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A twelfth man at silly mid on


« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2011, 01:00:39 PM »

Any ideas on what is wrong?
I've not had exactly this issue (because I always map the NAS to a drive letter) but I did have problems with the DNS323 disappearing temporarily during file copies, and fixed that by following the advice found via another post on these boards:

Troubleshooting: Connecting Windows Vista to shared drives and folders

Whilst it advertises itself as applying to Vista, I am running (the 64-bit version of) Windows 7 and the suggested fix resolved my issues - at least as far as the DNS-323 is concerned (although I suspect that you'll have to resort to the registry edit, since Microsoft neutered the Home edition of Windows 7 fairly badly and I seem to recall that the local policy editing was one of those areas).
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Cheers, Steve

Running a DNS-323 Rev. C1 with FW 1.10b5, fun_plug 0.5 and 1 Western Digital WD20EARS-00MVWB0, 4K aligned by 1.10FW, in Standard mode as a single volume
xardion
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2011, 10:44:20 PM »

Thanks for the link!  I had come across that myself when searching for a solution.  Unfortunately I am not sure how to use it with Win7HP.  I tried running "secpol.msc" but I do not have it.  I also search my registry for the "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa" folder, but I do not have it either.  When I search for LmCompatibilityLevel I do find it in two keys but I am not sure if it is the same because it is a key and not DWORD (I think that is the correct term).  Here is where I find it: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SeCEdit\Reg Values\MACHINE/System/CurrentControlSet/Control/Lsa/LmCompatibilityLevel" and "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SeCEdit\Reg Values\MACHINE/System/CurrentControlSet/Control/Lsa/LmCompatibilityLevel".  Also in those keys I do not have the LmCompatiblilityLevel DWORD, I only have DisplayValue and ValueType which are set to 3 and 4.  In the PDF they have you change it to 1, but from the screenshot it looks like it used to be 3 so I would guess I should change DisplayValue; though my initial though was the edit ValueType.  Either way I was too chicken to change either because it wasn't an exact match, plus I found it in two locations and not just one.

I wouldn't mind mapping the drive to a letter, but when I am having my problem I can't even do that.  I can see the NAS in the easy search utility, even login to the webpage, but I can't connect to it or even map it do a drive using the utility.  Sad  So I am not sure what is going on.  The weird thing is that it worked fine for the longest time, so I am guessing that this might have something to do with an Windows update.  Very frustrating!  Thanks again for the help...
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Steve Pitts
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A twelfth man at silly mid on


« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2011, 12:37:29 AM »

Unfortunately I am not sure how to use it with Win7HP
I was worried about that aspect, hence the comments in the last paragraph of my previous post. I originally bought my new gaming PC with Home Premium but after discovering, whilst trying to set things up, just how badly MS had crippled it (without advertising the fact anywhere that compared the editions) I swapped for Pro.

I also search my registry for the "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa" folder
Are you saying that the whole key doesn't exist?? I find that difficult to comprehend. Have you tried running REGEDIT as administrator?? The LmCompatibilityLevel value might well not exist, but as long as the Lsa key exists you should be able to add it and achieve the desired effect.

Just for clarity, the items displayed in the left hand pane in the REGEDIT window are referred to as keys, whilst the items in the right hand pane are values. Rather than replicate information that can readily be found elsewhere, please refer to this blog page for information on creating the desired value:

Windows 7 – Cannot connect to network drive

and scroll down until you find a fifteen step process preceded by a header (in a delicate pink) of '* Update on 2011-04-16: Thanks Scott. =)'. Since it isn't explicitly mentioned, I'd also recommend restarting the PC after making the change.

When I search for LmCompatibilityLevel I do find it in two keys
I believe that the two keys you've found provide details of various security related keys in the registry and are used by tools like SECPOL.MSC to control what options they display, what the potential values are and which registry keys to read/change. Leave well alone.
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Cheers, Steve

Running a DNS-323 Rev. C1 with FW 1.10b5, fun_plug 0.5 and 1 Western Digital WD20EARS-00MVWB0, 4K aligned by 1.10FW, in Standard mode as a single volume
xardion
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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2011, 09:14:34 PM »

Ah, I did NOT run regedit as ADMIN.  I will try that later today and let you know, thanks again for the help!  Smiley
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xardion
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2011, 09:06:38 PM »

Are you saying that the whole key doesn't exist?? I find that difficult to comprehend. Have you tried running REGEDIT as administrator?? The LmCompatibilityLevel value might well not exist, but as long as the Lsa key exists you should be able to add it and achieve the desired effect.

D'oh!  Well, I ran regedit as ADMIN and nothing was different, but I am not sure why I didn't think of creating the key like you mentioned.  Smiley  Anywho, I added it and everything seems to work great now.  Thanks for the help!
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xardion
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2011, 01:50:32 AM »

Well, I spoke too soon.  It seems I still have the same problem.  When I first turn on the DNS-323 I can access it instantly via my PS3, but no computers on my network can see it for at least an hour or so.  After that time has passed, I have no trouble accessing.  I added the LmCompatibilityLevel DWORD to the LSA folder, but it does not seem to have made a difference.
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Steve Pitts
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A twelfth man at silly mid on


« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2011, 02:39:30 AM »

When I first turn on the DNS-323 I can access it instantly via my PS3, but no computers on my network can see it for at least an hour or so
How are those computers attempting to access the unit, via an IP address or a name?? If via a name, is that name defined locally (eg. in a HOSTS file) or via a local name server?? Does the unit have a static IP or one doled out via DHCP?? If you are using a name to access the device, have you tried using the IP address instead?? Have you tried issuing 'NSLOOKUP devicename' from a command line session to see if the problem is that the system cannot find an IP address for the device rather than not being able to find the device itself??

I added the LmCompatibilityLevel DWORD to the LSA folder, but it does not seem to have made a difference.
IME that change affects the situation where Windows loses contact with the device in the middle of communicating with it (eg. a copy that fails part way through) so I'm unsure that the issue you describe in this post would be affected by that change.
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Cheers, Steve

Running a DNS-323 Rev. C1 with FW 1.10b5, fun_plug 0.5 and 1 Western Digital WD20EARS-00MVWB0, 4K aligned by 1.10FW, in Standard mode as a single volume
xardion
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Posts: 8


« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2011, 11:07:28 PM »

How are those computers attempting to access the unit, via an IP address or a name?? If via a name, is that name defined locally (eg. in a HOSTS file) or via a local name server?? Does the unit have a static IP or one doled out via DHCP?? If you are using a name to access the device, have you tried using the IP address instead?? Have you tried issuing 'NSLOOKUP devicename' from a command line session to see if the problem is that the system cannot find an IP address for the device rather than not being able to find the device itself??

D'oh.  Most of this was over my head, but I will do my best to answer.  I normally don't leave the NAS on very much, so I don't have it mapped to a drive.  So to access it I go through explorer then network or I type in \\dlink at run command (neither work).  I am not familiar with NSLOOKUP so I don't know how to use it to help troubleshoot.  I can ping the device no problem and access the device webpage, it is just trying to get to the drives that I have problems when I first turn it on.  I enabled LLTD, but it didn't seem to help.
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Rodent
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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2011, 04:54:28 AM »

This is a master browser problem and has been reported several times, the DNS-323 will become the master browser regardless of what is happening in your network, so when the DNS-323 is the first device turned on in your network than other devices are turned on everything works fine, but if the DNS-323 is turned on after another device is already the master browser than you get 2 master browser and the DNS-323 is not contactable.

You do not have to delete the network share all you have to do is edit and save without changing anything (touch) the share will cause an election for the master browser position and the DNS-323 will win.

This is what I have experienced anyway.

R.
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Steve Pitts
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Posts: 67

A twelfth man at silly mid on


« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2011, 02:47:20 AM »

Most of this was over my head
Which may make the more obvious fix a bit of a problem, but I'll try anyway Wink

Quote from: xardion
I am not familiar with NSLOOKUP so I don't know how to use it to help troubleshoot
Open a command prompt window (lots of ways to do that, easiest is probably either using Windows key+R to open the run dialog, typing cmd and pressing Enter, or simply clicking on the Windows globe (aka the Start button) on the taskbar, typing comm into the search box and then selecting the Command Prompt link that should appear near the top of the area above the search box). Then type this command into the resulting window:

Code:
nslookup dlink

(assuming that I'm correct in divining that your NAS box is named dlink as far as your local network is concerned). The resultant output will be several lines long, with the first couple telling you which server is responding to your DNS request (or that no server is) and the last few detailing information about the IP address of the name you've requested (for comparison purposes, try it using google.com, or some other well known domain name, to see what that produces). If the output indicates problems connecting to a DNS server or that the server does not know about your NAS box then Rodent may well be correct in diagnosing a master browser problem (if you're feeling brave you could dig through the event logs using the Event Viewer and see if you can see any related error messages).

Personally, given that this is a home network with no domain server controlling the name server process, I'd recommend using the HOSTS file to resolve your issue (and that is exactly how I've got my machines set up locally) but that may be a step too far given your original comment. If you can live with Rodent's workaround for the master browser problem - and it resolves your issues - then perhaps we'll let sleeping dogs lie.
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Cheers, Steve

Running a DNS-323 Rev. C1 with FW 1.10b5, fun_plug 0.5 and 1 Western Digital WD20EARS-00MVWB0, 4K aligned by 1.10FW, in Standard mode as a single volume
xardion
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« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2011, 06:31:22 AM »

Rodent, ok I read up some on master browser (http://scottiestech.info/2009/02/14/how-to-determine-the-master-browser-in-a-windows-workgroup/) and poked around using NBTSTAT and NET VIEW from a CMD prompt.  When I boot the NAS first and then my PCs I am not able to access the share folders.  I see my desktop (win 7) as the master browser but I do not see the dlink anywhere.  We left the house for a bit and when I came back I fired up my PC first and after 10 or so minutes the NAS.  It popped right it to the network area, I could access the files, and I was able to see it with NET VIEW.  I checked w/ NBTSTAT and my desktop was the master browser again.  So it would seem (for at least this one try) that it worked booting the NAS after my PC.  That way it seems the see my desktop as the master browser.  So I am guessing (maybe?) that when I boot the NAS first it thinks it is the master browser but then my PC tries to act as one as well?  I don't know.  Smiley  I will try booting my PC first over the next couple days and see what happens.

Steve, I ran NSLOOKUP dlink (I also tried \\dlink w/ the same result) and I get this msg "*** k-nxr-a01.isp.t-ipnet.de can't find \dlink: Non-existent domain".  NSLOOKUP also did not work on either of my PC names as well; even when I could access the dlink.  I used to mess w/ the host file in winxp, but I have not messed w/ it since I switched to win 7.  Are you recommending something like putting the dlink and ip address in the HOSTS file?
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Steve Pitts
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Posts: 67

A twelfth man at silly mid on


« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2011, 12:09:50 AM »

I ran NSLOOKUP dlink (I also tried \\dlink w/ the same result) and I get this msg "*** k-nxr-a01.isp.t-ipnet.de can't find \dlink: Non-existent domain"
So the request is being passed to your ISP, who have no idea what that name represents, which is no great surprise. This is why I add entries to the HOSTS file, because in a local network there is no name server charged with tracking all of the local network devices (if you have your router set up to handle both DHCP and DNS duties then it may perform that role, but my experience has been that that approach isn't reliable). My guess is that if you start the NAS first then Windows has no visibility of it when it starts, whereas when you start the NAS after the PC then it announces itself to the network on start up and Windows picks up on its existence.

Quote from: xardion
Are you recommending something like putting the dlink and ip address in the HOSTS file?
Yes, exactly that. Obviously you need to assign a static IP address to the NAS (which I do in my router's DHCP configuration for all of my devices, by associating each MAC address with a particular IP, rather than hardcoding the IP into each individual device but that is simply a personal preference) but then it is just a question of adding an entry to c:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts (for which you'll need to run a text editor - Notepad will do - as administrator). On 64 bit versions of Windows 7 you'll need to use a text editor that runs in 64 bit mode because Windows pulls some strange tricks with the filesystem and a 32 bit program may not be able to see that file.
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Cheers, Steve

Running a DNS-323 Rev. C1 with FW 1.10b5, fun_plug 0.5 and 1 Western Digital WD20EARS-00MVWB0, 4K aligned by 1.10FW, in Standard mode as a single volume
xardion
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Posts: 8


« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2011, 11:55:57 PM »

Yes, exactly that. Obviously you need to assign a static IP address to the NAS (which I do in my router's DHCP configuration for all of my devices, by associating each MAC address with a particular IP, rather than hardcoding the IP into each individual device but that is simply a personal preference) but then it is just a question of adding an entry to c:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts (for which you'll need to run a text editor - Notepad will do - as administrator). On 64 bit versions of Windows 7 you'll need to use a text editor that runs in 64 bit mode because Windows pulls some strange tricks with the filesystem and a 32 bit program may not be able to see that file.

Well, I tried booting the PC, laptop, and NAS in different orders but I could not find any pattern as to whether or not I would be able to access files on the NAS as soon as it booted.  It did not seem to matter whether the NAS was turned on first or not; nor which device (NAS or computer) was the master server browser.  I added the static IP for the NAS to my HOSTS file like you suggested as well and think that may have addressed my issue.  Now when I boot I can access the NAS, but I don't see DLINK when I run NET VIEW (though I can type ping dlink and it works).  So I will have to give it a couple days to see if it works every time.  Thanks again for all the help!
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xpertise
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« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2011, 06:00:09 PM »

I resolved my problem after 3 days of torture and twenty thousand suggestions on the web by resetting the DNS-323 to factory settings without impacting my data.  Who would have evr of thought that it would be that easy?
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