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Author Topic: DCS-932LB1 - power/WPS flash when I use injector/splitter  (Read 1660 times)

mvotter00

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  • Posts: 2
DCS-932LB1 - power/WPS flash when I use injector/splitter
« on: February 08, 2015, 11:05:36 AM »

Good day all.

I have several D-Link cameras installed in a restaurant and, for the last few (932L and 5009s), I used POE injectors/splitters so I wouldn't have to run extension cords to them. For 4 out of 5, it's been easy. For this last location, I'm stumped. I searched the manual, Google, and this forum for possible similar problems but came up empty.

What I have:
 - DCS-932LB1 camera
 - voltage of 5.03-5.04 measured at transformer
 - 80' of CAT5e
 - voltage of 5.03 at splitter

When I plug in the camera, the power and WPS lights flash steadily (once per second). I tested the cable--all 8 pins good. I ran 100' of new cable down the hall--same thing. I swapped injectors, splitters, and even changed the camera--to no avail.

The camera works at a different location and I have a 5009 that's further away (probably 110'). None of these locations are beyond any accepted limits and, aside from DLink's preference not to use injectors/splitters, I can't understand what is so different about this setup.

Suggestions or ideas would be most welcome. Thanks in advance.

Mike
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mvotter00

  • Level 1 Member
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  • Posts: 2
Re: DCS-932LB1 - power/WPS flash when I use injector/splitter
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2015, 12:33:19 PM »

I talked to an electrician/security camera guy who gave me an answer. I'll pass it on for reference.

When I measure voltage at the distant end, the multimeter displays the 5v steadily because there is no impedance from the DMM. When I plug in the camera, the voltage lights up the LEDs on the camera. However, resistance of the wires and the load from the camera is too much so voltage drops and the lights go off. Once the voltage drops, the resistance drops as well so the voltage comes back up. Repeat ad nauseum.

If I could increase the gauge of the wires one or two steps, it would probably work but, with the 22 AWG I have, it's not enough. I ran an extension cord from a nearby room so the camera would get proper power. It's not my preferred solution but it works.

Thanks.

Mike
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