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Author Topic: IPv6  (Read 55395 times)

Geraner

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IPv6
« on: May 08, 2009, 02:55:35 AM »

Hi,

I have seen that the new DIR-825 is including IPv6 support.
In the datasheet it is written:
Quote
IPV6 READY
This router carries both the silver and gold IPv6 Ready logos, signifying that it not only supports the IPv6 protocol, but is also compatible with IPv6 equipment
from other manufacturers. It allows you to move to a 128-bit addressing system and directly connect to anybody in the world using your unique IP address. Using
a dual-stack architecture, this router can handle routing for both IPv4 and IPv6 networks at the same time, so you can be assured that your equipment is forward
and backward compatible.
What's about the DIR-655? Will there be a firmware update so that the DIR-655 also support IPv6.
Will this then work with all HW versions, or only with A3+A4?
What's the status regarding this?
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DIR-825 - HW: B1 - Firmware: 2.05WW Build05 Beta01
DNS-323 - HW: B1- Firmware: 1.08 Beta build 05

bangali

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2009, 10:59:57 PM »

Hi,

Any word from the D-Link team on this?

Thanks.
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EddieZ

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2009, 02:19:01 AM »

It does work currently with IPv6 tunneling. Not a lot of provides offer a native IPv6 connection, so besides a router that's IPv6 capable, you also need a IPv6 capable modem (which are also still pretty rare)
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DIR-655 H/W: A2 FW: 1.33

Azuse

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2009, 07:01:36 AM »

A cheap modem (in comparison to my router) is easy enough to replace. IPv6 isn't exactly new news and these days most isp cover it, if only partially. Given that IPv4 will, finally, be running out the "I don't want to do/pay for anything else" argument people have been hiding behind the past few year is going out the window.

Still, it would be nice knowing the device could run IPv6 even if there are no short term plans to make it happen.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2009, 07:05:59 AM by Azuse »
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EddieZ

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2009, 08:27:09 AM »

"IPv6 capable cable modems" are primarily docsis 3.0 modems. I don't about your country, but over here they are only starting introduction slowly (together with 30 mbit+ cable connections).... Any ADSL modem supporting transparent bridging or PPPoA-to-PPTP relaying is suitable for the "ADSLv6" (IPv6
over PPP), so that would make it easier to do.

Looking at the backend, IMHO the cable market is again more difficult to adapt to IPv6. For xDSL there will be no impact on DSLAM since they are transparant too.

There's still 2 years to go until the final IPv4 address is taken. IMHO this will first be solved with IPv6 and 6to4 tunneling and for full IPv6 enabled products you will need to buy a new router. In two years the DIR655 will long and gone be EOL.
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DIR-655 H/W: A2 FW: 1.33

lizzi555

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2009, 08:52:05 AM »

Quote from: EddieZ
In two years the DIR655 will long and gone be EOL

How do you know ? In EU, for example in Germany, D-Link has 11 years warranty on their 11N products.
The DIR-655 is still one of the most sold 11N routers. Mine was one of the first Rev A2 here and is 2 1/2 years old - still 8 1/2 to live or to be RMA'd.

I don't know much about US lifetime of this device but I think as long as it is been sold in this "high" margins, they won't let it die.

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EddieZ

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2009, 09:06:32 AM »

How do you know ? In EU, for example in Germany, D-Link has 11 years warranty on their 11N products.
The DIR-655 is still one of the most sold 11N routers. Mine was one of the first Rev A2 here and is 2 1/2 years old - still 8 1/2 to live or to be RMA'd.

I don't know much about US lifetime of this device but I think as long as it is been sold in this "high" margins, they won't let it die.



Warranty is something completely different. Providing active support and updates is linked to the products' lifecycle. By the end of the year I estimate that there will be a new model, replacing the ZDIR 655 as premium consumer model. Remaining stock of 655 will be there and will be sold, but the development will move on and perhaps provide a final firmware update.
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DIR-655 H/W: A2 FW: 1.33

Lycan

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2009, 09:35:09 AM »

IPv6 support is mandatory for us, the 655 as well as our current N line is slated for upgrade, but that could change at any second.

To my knowledge most home routers will use a NAT program that allows IPv6 on the WAN and an IPv4 Local network since the NAT is not transparent.

This would make more sense as the average user is already familiar with ipv4 addressing.
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EddieZ

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2009, 03:00:48 PM »

Off topic, but nice to know: IPv6 firewalls (PC based) are still extremely rare. Opening up IPv6 connections would leave all PC's quite open to all kinds of abuse....
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DIR-655 H/W: A2 FW: 1.33

Lycan

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2009, 03:05:47 PM »

Hence the IPv4 NAT Translation.
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Geraner

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2009, 09:50:24 AM »

To my knowledge most home routers will use a NAT program that allows IPv6 on the WAN and an IPv4 Local network since the NAT is not transparent.

This would make more sense as the average user is already familiar with ipv4 addressing.

This sounds logic for me.

My ISP hasn't changed to IPv6 yet. I don't have xDSL or and don't other modem. I just have a LAN-Connection in the wall, where i plug-in my router. The IP-address I get then via DHCP from the WAN side. It's an optical-fiber solution the ISP installed on the house where I live. (100/10 Mbit/s internet connection)

Offtopic:
Looks like I even have more speed as I pay for. :D

(Traffic trough the D-Link DIR-655)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2009, 09:54:55 AM by Geraner »
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DIR-825 - HW: B1 - Firmware: 2.05WW Build05 Beta01
DNS-323 - HW: B1- Firmware: 1.08 Beta build 05

Lycan

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2009, 10:17:13 AM »

That seems rediclously high.

Try this one.

http://Speakeasy.net/speedtest
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Fatman

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2009, 10:28:58 AM »

I wish there was a consumer available 100/10 fibre to the premise solution in the US.

IT infrastructure is getting better every day, maybe someday soon I will be drooling at a 1000mb in house drop that is suddenly available.
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non progredi est regredi

Geraner

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2009, 11:21:39 AM »

That seems rediclously high.

Try this one.

http://Speakeasy.net/speedtest

I was testing this Site, but get only about 4-6 Mbit/s in both directions.

Checked it with this Swedish site http://www.bredbandskollen.se/
There I got:
Downlink 373,84 Mbit/s
Uplink 15,19 Mbit/s

Tested it again at Speedtest.net against different servers.
The results where:
Stockholm / Sweden 321,08 Mbit/s / 14,89 Mbit/s
Malmö / Sweden 360,55 Mbit/s / 16,15 Mbit/s
Oslo / Norway 311,82 Mbit/s / 15,20 Mbit/s
Helsinki / Finland 357,70 Mbit/s / 14,10 Mbit/s
London / England 106,17 Mbit/s / 12,81 Mbit/s
Nürnberg / Germany 17,29 Mbit/s / 10,61 Mbit/s
All other server within Europe I get about 2-6 Mbit/s downlink and uplink speed.

As soon as I'm using a test-server outside Scandinavia, the speed drops a lot.

Also the test shown in my post above is done during the day and not at the evening as now. So there where not many people online from home there home because they where at work. For this reason the result was maybe so extremely high compared to now. (476 Mbit/s against 320 Mbit/s)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2009, 11:23:20 AM by Geraner »
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DIR-825 - HW: B1 - Firmware: 2.05WW Build05 Beta01
DNS-323 - HW: B1- Firmware: 1.08 Beta build 05

Msradell

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Re: IPv6
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2009, 11:55:03 AM »

I'd actually expect the speed to be higher in the evening because of network wasn't being used so much by businesses.  At least that's how it is in many places, the local drops are not busy during the day of the overall network volume is much busier.
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