D-Link Xtreme N (Platinum Products) > DIR-825

300Mbps on 802.11n 2.4Ghz

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SBMongoos:

--- Quote from: FurryNutz on October 14, 2011, 09:35:58 AM ---It's possible that your device might not support 300 Mb connection on 2.4Ghz. I presume you have the 2.4Ghz radio set for single mode N only?

--- End quote ---

Yes, if you mean I have the DIR-825 set to 802.11n only for 2.4Ghz.  Channel width is set to 20/40Mhz.  Fat tolerant is disabled on the WiFi card (which says to ignore 40Mhz on 2.4Ghz).

Patrick533:
The routers made to the latest 802.11n have a "good neighbor" policy built in. This will cause them NOT to go into 40 MHZ mode if your 2.4 band is locally crowded. A couple of pointers, choose channel 1 or 11, this will put your extra 20 Mhz above or below channel 1/11 (if you have a US model).

Also if your device will support it, enable short GI on 2.4, this will get you to 150 if your client supports it and also 300 instead of 270. But not all devices support it. My Dir-825 always has done 300 if the client cooperates!

I hit 300 with my Acer laptop without a hitch, out of the box settings the 1st day I brought it home!

SBMongoos:

--- Quote from: Patrick533 on October 16, 2011, 07:35:00 AM ---The routers made to the latest 802.11n have a "good neighbor" policy built in. This will cause them NOT to go into 40 MHZ mode if your 2.4 band is locally crowded. A couple of pointers, choose channel 1 or 11, this will put your extra 20 Mhz above or below channel 1/11 (if you have a US model).

Also if your device will support it, enable short GI on 2.4, this will get you to 150 if your client supports it and also 300 instead of 270. But not all devices support it. My Dir-825 always has done 300 if the client cooperates!

I hit 300 with my Acer laptop without a hitch, out of the box settings the 1st day I brought it home!

--- End quote ---

Short GI is enabled on 5Ghz and 2.4Ghz already.  This is through the DIR-825.

I can see 18 other WiFi signals downstairs. More when on the loft.  Looks like I'm the only one also using 5Ghz though.  I typically use 5Ghz on the laptop and it seems to stay at around 270Mbps. I've tried different channels and 44/48 seem to be best. Otherwise I do see one of the channels getting dropped and that impacts performance.  44/48 seems to be stable.

On the 2.4Ghz I've been using channel 3. Although that channel is clear it does overlap several WiFi signals most of which are using channel 6.  Channel one looks to be using about three APs.  There are 7 APs using channel 11.  I'd prefer to use 2.4Ghz with the laptop as it does a better job maintaining a stronger signal.  But, with all that's going on here that's arguable.  Channel 1 has 2 APs with a third that shows up that's looks to be trying to channel bond.  Plus, my Boxee Box uses 2.4Ghz and is 802.11n. When monitoring it I would say it's doing 130Mbps also.  The router shows throughput at 65Mbps typically.  Which is half of the connection speed.  If I can could get the 300Mbps going then this would boost the WiFi connection to the Boxee.  Although, I will say that I have watched 1080P movies on Vudu without issue.

I'm a little confused by your statement, "A couple of pointers, choose channel 1 or 11, this will put your extra 20 Mhz above or below channel 1/11 (if you have a US model).".  Why choose either of these channels if the extra 20Mhz is above or below channel 1 or 11 if you want to use one of those same channels?  Make sense?

Patrick533:
Hello again,

There are only 3 20Mhz channels that don't overlap (each of the 11 channels are only 5Mhz each). 1, 6 and 11. Each STANDARD 150Mbps channel is 20Mhz wide. So, knowing this, Channel 1 occupies channels 2 and 3 and also spectrum below channel 1(it is legal), channel 6 occupies channels 4-8 and channel 11 occupies 9, 10 and spectrum above channel 11, once again, this is 20Mhz channels.

Now consider a 40Mhz channel (2 bonded 20Mhz channels). If you choose channel 6 and a 40Mhz channel, you will either be wiping out channels 1-8 or channels or 4-11.

It is confusing for most people to understand when they choose channel 1, they also choose channels 2 and 3.

Now the good neighbor policy implemented in 802.11N in the USA says if there are people on other channels that you would interfere with by selecting a 40Mhz Channel, it won't let you select a 40Mhz channel, by NOT letting you select a 40Mhz channel, it is limiting your speed to 150Mbps or below(depending on many things). The hardware is working as intended by law. Being most people don't use 5Ghz(yet), you should have all the bandwidth you need up there.

The overall problem, when 802.11 was allocated spectrum many years ago, the speeds we use today were not considered, so they did not give us enough spectrum, thus today our channels overlap.

The Dir-825 will indeed do 300Mbps, my new home only has 1 WiFi user in the neighborhood, so I can select a 40Mhz channel and the router will give it to me. I also have another router that will allow me to force a 40Mhz channel and squish anything under it (it also goes to channel 14 instead of 11), but then again I also have an FCC license that is valid in the 2.4Ghz ISM band. But with that license comes the knowledge that by forcing a 40Mhz channel, it is BAD neighbor policy and I could cause interference to other people.

So, quite simply, you have too much interference from local users to do what you want, which is 300Mbps on the 2.4Ghz band.

The reason I advise people to use channel 1 or 11 is, most routers come default on 6, when you use 1 or 11, part of your RF use is outside the band, less interference.

Here is a Wiki article, sorry if i was too technical, Radio engineer for almost 30 years.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11




SBMongoos:

--- Quote from: Patrick533 on October 17, 2011, 09:20:46 AM ---Hello again,

There are only 3 20Mhz channels that don't overlap (each of the 11 channels are only 5Mhz each). 1, 6 and 11. Each STANDARD 150Mbps channel is 20Mhz wide. So, knowing this, Channel 1 occupies channels 2 and 3 and also spectrum below channel 1(it is legal), channel 6 occupies channels 4-8 and channel 11 occupies 9, 10 and spectrum above channel 11, once again, this is 20Mhz channels.

Now consider a 40Mhz channel (2 bonded 20Mhz channels). If you choose channel 6 and a 40Mhz channel, you will either be wiping out channels 1-8 or channels or 4-11.

It is confusing for most people to understand when they choose channel 1, they also choose channels 2 and 3.

Now the good neighbor policy implemented in 802.11N in the USA says if there are people on other channels that you would interfere with by selecting a 40Mhz Channel, it won't let you select a 40Mhz channel, by NOT letting you select a 40Mhz channel, it is limiting your speed to 150Mbps or below(depending on many things). The hardware is working as intended by law. Being most people don't use 5Ghz(yet), you should have all the bandwidth you need up there.

The overall problem, when 802.11 was allocated spectrum many years ago, the speeds we use today were not considered, so they did not give us enough spectrum, thus today our channels overlap.

The Dir-825 will indeed do 300Mbps, my new home only has 1 WiFi user in the neighborhood, so I can select a 40Mhz channel and the router will give it to me. I also have another router that will allow me to force a 40Mhz channel and squish anything under it (it also goes to channel 14 instead of 11), but then again I also have an FCC license that is valid in the 2.4Ghz ISM band. But with that license comes the knowledge that by forcing a 40Mhz channel, it is BAD neighbor policy and I could cause interference to other people.

So, quite simply, you have too much interference from local users to do what you want, which is 300Mbps on the 2.4Ghz band.

The reason I advise people to use channel 1 or 11 is, most routers come default on 6, when you use 1 or 11, part of your RF use is outside the band, less interference.

Here is a Wiki article, sorry if i was too technical, Radio engineer for almost 30 years.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11




--- End quote ---

Personally,  I'm glad you are here and that was extremely helpful and I understand it.  It's clear that in my townhouse community I will not get the 300Mbps on 2.4Ghz due to overlapping channels and the good neighbor policy with 802.11n.  I remember when I had an old dual channel DLink DIR-784 router some time ago that used an Atheros chip that could do 108Mbps on 802.11g.  But I also know that it was said to cause interference for others.

Edit: I do find it ODD however that I can connect to my neighbor at 300Mbps on 2.4Ghz and he's using channel 6 that's VERY crowded. Although it was temporary it seems.

As mentioned I can use 5Ghz on the laptop. I don't understand why media devices don't have 5Ghz as this has been a selling point for those selling WiFi routers with 5Ghz.  To move media over to 5Ghz.  But, you cannot when your media device only has 2.4Ghz.  Was hoping to tweak the 2.4Ghz to 300Mbps for my Boxee Box. Again,  all seems to be working anyway. But... blah blah (LOL).

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