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Author Topic: Fastest way to recover the data from a HDD out of a DNS323 into NTFS?  (Read 3737 times)

ddombrowski

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So, I host offsite backups from my father's business on my DNS 323 in the left bay (my personal data is in the right bay).

He outgrew the 1TB drive and I'm upgrading him to a 2TB drive.

I pulled my personal drive out and put the new 2TB drive in its place.  Then I formatted the 2TB drive, went into the applications area, and ran a transfer from Volume 1 to Volume 2.

Its been transferring for 36 hours now, and we've got 430GB of 850GB transferred.  To do this once in awhile when we upgrade is not the end of the world, since this is only his offsite backup and he (or I) are not actually working the device hard.

My concern is what might happen if he really does need his offsite backup, as in, some catastrophe happens to his office and everything is lost.  48 hours to get another copy of his data is a bit long to wait.

If I were in this scenario, would it be possible to boot a regular machine with SATAII with a linux liveCD or USB drive and manually copy the data off?  I assume this would be faster as the DNS323 is CPU limited in its file transfers.

If I could do this, how do I get the data onto a windows partition for him to be able to use?  The last time I dabbled with linux-windows transfers the NTFS drivers caused corruption and couldn't be used to write, but that was 5+ years ago.  Is it different now?  Or would I have to go through some SAMBA-Windows network interface, or some kind of virtual machine to get the files onto a NTFS drive?

As for the speed of the current file transfers, I'm not sure if this is indicating a problem or not.  The new hard drive (2TB) is a green drive, the old 1TB drive is not.  As for the type of data, I really don't know, because I don't peek into my father's business data often.  Assuming the data was lots of little files, would that potentially slow down the transfer to the levels I'm seeing?

Edited to add - I read the FAQ about windows recovery using EXT2IFS.  I guess part of my question was 'would doing it the linux route be faster?'

Also, with the new 2TB drive, I upgraded to the latest 1.10 beta firmware (or beta-made-final).  I don't use any of the applications, DLNA, itunes server, or anything like that, so I figured it was okay.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2012, 07:54:15 AM by ddombrowski »
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JavaLawyer

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Please see this sticky post: DNS-323 - Data Recovery (Windows PC).

There are Windows applications available that will enable you to mount DNS-323 formatted volumes on a Windows PC. From there, you should be able to quickly copy your data to another internal HDD.
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Find answers here: D-Link ShareCenter FAQ I D-Link Network Camera FAQ
There's no such thing as too many backups FFC

ddombrowski

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Got it, thanks.  Yes, I had read the section in the FAQ about recovering in windows.  I suppose my windows-linux experience is limited, but I always thought accessing the file systems from a different OS was generally a bad practice and usually slow, but I admit I am no expert.

If EXT2IFS is stable and fast, then that doesn't look like a bad solution.

Thanks.

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fordem

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Presumably you're doing the transfer using a Windows system - if this is the case then the data flows from the NAS to the Windows system and then back to the NAS, and yes, file size does make a significant difference, with large numbers of small files really pulling the transfer speeds down.
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RAID1 is for disk redundancy - NOT data backup - don't confuse the two.

ddombrowski

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Presumably you're doing the transfer using a Windows system - if this is the case then the data flows from the NAS to the Windows system and then back to the NAS, and yes, file size does make a significant difference, with large numbers of small files really pulling the transfer speeds down.

Well, that was the way I started it, which was indeed quite slow.  Then, I realized I could go to the device's webpage, go to the applications and then the 'schedule download' and specify Volume_2 to Volume_1.

So I did that.  I don't have any progress bar or reported transfer speed (other than periodically checking the size of the second folder and dividing by the number of hours its been), but its got to be faster than going over ethernet.
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