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Author Topic: Very slow speeds on IPv6  (Read 57525 times)

dk2463

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #30 on: April 23, 2014, 07:32:50 AM »

I wish someone would!

I wonder if someone should have a closer look at his set up... ::)

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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #31 on: April 23, 2014, 07:49:15 AM »

I would ask PT if he can help you review the settings on the ISP modem and DAP. Use Teamviwer, it's a good program and it's safe and secure.

I'll check on if D-Link has any info about Bridge mode and IPv6 support.

 
I wish someone would!

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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #32 on: May 05, 2014, 01:52:05 PM »

Any status on this?  ???
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dk2463

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #33 on: May 06, 2014, 01:51:27 PM »

Any status on this?  ???

Hi,

No, no one has contacted me.
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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #34 on: May 06, 2014, 02:00:38 PM »

Would you send PacketTracer a PM and see if he is willing to have a look at your configuration settings and see if everything is set up well? I'm will waiting on some word from D-Link as they have said this is under review and I don't know when or if I'll hear anything back.

For now lets see if we can make sure your configuration is set well and maybe PT might see something or have some other suggestions.

He's in the EU region so time frames will be different, ask him when a good time for him to help you out is.

Keep us posted please.

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PacketTracer

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2014, 07:36:32 AM »

Hi dk2463,

since we couldn't manage to set up remote control via TeamViewer (maybe due to a too big version mismatch or private use not beeing supported between continents or for whatever reasons) I suggest you try the following of your own:

I suppose that it is a local matter your DAP device having problems to bridge IPv6 packets WLAN <--> LAN(wired) and vice versa. In order to check if this is true I suggest you do some file copies of huge files between a WIN7 computer (call it PC1) directly connected to your router/cable modem and another WIN7 computer (call it PC2) sitting behind/wired to your DAP device thereby measuring the time it takes to complete each file copy. The connection between PC1 and PC2 has to be IPv6 only.

So first of all you have to create an IPv6 connection between PC1 and PC2. Let's assume the IPv6 address of PC2 is 2001:db8::2 and you have created a network share at PC2 called "share2", you would sit down at PC1, open a command prompt and type

net use Z: \\2001-db8--2.ipv6-literal.net\share2

If you are asked for a user name and a password enter these credentials in order to successfully complete this operation. For explanation of "ipv6-literal.net" look here. For conversion of the actual IPv6 address of PC2 you can use the aid of this site. If drive letter Z is already in use at PC1 take another free drive letter instead.

After that at PC1 in addition to your local drives C, D, ... you should see another drive Z inside Windows explorer which actually is a network drive pointing to "share2" network share residing at PC2. If you copy files between C and Z you do this via a TCP/IPv6 SMB connection between PC1 and PC2.

In the next step at PC1 open Windows explorer and create a folder C:\TEST. Change into this folder and create a TXT file called mkfile.txt. Open this file (double click --> notepad) and copy the following contents to the file:

Code: [Select]
@echo off
SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION
set MAXSIZE=1024
set MINSIZE=1
set DEFAULTSIZE=5
set ROOT=%~dp0
set MY_NAME=%~n0
set TEMPFILE=%ROOT%__TEMPFILE__
set BUFFER=%ROOT%__BUFFERFILE__
set ARGS=
:loopArgs
shift
set parm=%0
if not defined parm goto doneArgs
if not defined ARGS (
set ARGS=%parm%
) else (
set ARGS=%ARGS% %parm%
)
goto loopArgs
:doneArgs
set SYNTAX_ERROR=FALSE
call :evalArgs
if %SYNTAX_ERROR%==TRUE (
call :printUsage
goto end
)
set FILE=IAM-%SIZE%-MB
set MKFILE=%ROOT%%FILE%
echo.
echo    Creating "%FILE%" [%SIZE% MB] ...
call :delFiles
set CREATE_OK=TRUE
call :createFile %SIZE%
if %CREATE_OK%==FALSE (
call :localCopyError
call :delFiles
echo.
echo    Files were deleted.
  goto end
) else (
echo    --^> DONE^^!
)
goto end
:missingValue
if %SYNTAX_ERROR%==FALSE echo.
echo ERROR: -%1: %2 unspecified.
goto :EOF
:parmValueNotAllowed
if %SYNTAX_ERROR%==FALSE echo.
echo ERROR: %1: "%2" outside allowed interval [%3,%4].
goto :EOF
:printUsage
echo.
echo %MY_NAME% v1.0 - Creates a file of a desired size in MB
echo Copyright (C) 2014, PacketTracer
echo.
echo Syntax: %MY_NAME% [[-l size] ^| [-h]]
echo     -h             Shows this help.
echo     -l size        Size of the file ^(integer count of MB^).
echo                    Default: size=%DEFAULTSIZE% MB.
echo                    Allowed sizes: %MINSIZE% - %MAXSIZE% MB.
echo.
goto :EOF
:localCopyError
echo.
echo    ^|    
echo    ^| ERROR: An error occured while copying files.
echo    ^| Check if there is enough free space within script folder
echo    ^|
echo    ^|    %ROOT%
echo    ^|
echo    v
echo     ---------------------------------------------------------^> ERROR
goto :EOF
:evalArgs
set /a maxParm=0
for %%i in (%ARGS%) do (
if /i "%%i"=="-h" (
set SYNTAX_ERROR=TRUE
goto :EOF
) else (
set /a maxParm+=1
set arg[!maxParm!]=%%i
)
)
if %maxParm% EQU 0 (
set SIZE=%DEFAULTSIZE%
goto :EOF
)
set lIsSet=FALSE
set /a parmIndex=1
:loopParm
call :readArg !parmIndex!
if /i !aktParm!==-l (
if %lIsSet%==TRUE (
set SYNTAX_ERROR=TRUE
goto :EOF
)
set /a parmIndex+=1
if !parmIndex! GTR %maxParm% (
call :missingValue l size
set SYNTAX_ERROR=TRUE
goto :EOF
)
call :readArg !parmIndex!
if /i !aktParm!==-l (
call :missingValue l size
set SYNTAX_ERROR=TRUE
goto :EOF
) else (
set SIZE=!aktParm!
set valOk=FALSE
for /l %%i in (%MINSIZE%,1,%MAXSIZE%) do (
if !SIZE!==%%i set valOk=TRUE
)
if !valOk!==FALSE (
call :parmValueNotAllowed -l !SIZE! %MINSIZE% %MAXSIZE%
set SYNTAX_ERROR=TRUE
goto :EOF
) else (
set lIsSet=TRUE
)
)
) else (
set SYNTAX_ERROR=TRUE
goto :EOF
)
set /a parmIndex+=1
if %parmIndex% GTR %maxParm% (
goto :EOF
) else (
goto loopParm
)
:readArg
for /l %%p in (%1,1,%1) do set aktParm=!arg[%%p]!
goto :EOF
:clear
if exist %1 del /f %1
goto :EOF
:createFile
set dezVal=%1
set /a n=0
:binaryLoop
set /a s[%n%]=dezVal%%2
set /a dezVal=dezVal/2
if %dezVal% NEQ 0 (
set /a n+=1
goto binaryLoop
)
call :clear "%TEMPFILE%"
echo #-BIGTXTFILE-#>"%TEMPFILE%"
for /l %%i in (1,1,16) do (
call :appendFile "%TEMPFILE%" "%TEMPFILE%"
if !CREATE_OK!==FALSE goto :EOF
)
call :clear "%MKFILE%"
for /l %%i in (0,1,%n%) do (
if !s[%%i]!==1 (
if exist "%MKFILE%" (
call :appendFile "%MKFILE%" "%TEMPFILE%"
if !CREATE_OK!==FALSE goto :EOF
) else (
if %%i EQU %n% (
ren "%TEMPFILE%" "%FILE%"
) else (
copy "%TEMPFILE%" "%MKFILE%" 1>nul 2>&1
if ERRORLEVEL 1 (
set CREATE_OK=FALSE
goto :EOF
)
)
)
)
if %%i LSS %n% (
call :appendFile "%TEMPFILE%" "%TEMPFILE%"
if !CREATE_OK!==FALSE goto :EOF
)
)
call :clear "%TEMPFILE%"
goto :EOF
:appendFile
call :clear "%BUFFER%"
copy %1 /b + %2 /b "%BUFFER%" 1>nul 2>&1
if ERRORLEVEL 1 (
set CREATE_OK=FALSE
goto :EOF
)
del %1
ren "%BUFFER%" "%~nx1"
goto :EOF
:delFiles
call :clear "%TEMPFILE%"
call :clear "%MKFILE%"
call :clear "%BUFFER%"
goto :EOF
:end
ENDLOCAL

After this save and close the file.

Open a command prompt and enter:
Code: [Select]
C:
cd \TEST
ren mkfile.txt mkfile.cmd

Now inside C:\TEST you have a script called mkfile.cmd you can use to create huge files of sizes between 1 MB and 1024 MB. For explanation enter mkfile -h. For example if you enter mkfile -l 100 the script creates a file named IAM-100-MB of size 100 MB.

Finally you can use these files IAM-XX-MB and copy them between C:\TEST and Z: e.g.


C:
cd \TEST
copy /Y IAM-100-MB Z:\ 1>nul 2>&1


thereby measuring the time it takes.

After completion you can also copy the file in the opposite direction (again measuring the time it takes):

copy /Y Z:\IAM-100-MB .\ 1>nul 2>&1

In order to measure the time a copy takes more comfortably you can also write two small scripts called

C:\TEST\forward.cmd
C:\TEST\backward.cmd

with the following contents:

forward.cmd:
Code: [Select]
@echo off
echo Start of copy: %DATE% %TIME%
echo Copying file %1 Local --^> Remote. Please wait ...
copy /Y %1 Z:\ 1>nul 2>&1
echo End of copy: %DATE% %TIME%

backward.cmd:
Code: [Select]
@echo off
echo Start of copy: %DATE% %TIME%
echo Copying file %1 Remote --^> Local. Please wait ...
copy /Y Z:\%1 .\ 1>nul 2>&1
echo End of copy: %DATE% %TIME%

(If you use a network drive letter other than Z you must adapt these scripts accordingly)

These scripts print time information straight before the start and after the end of the copy process. From file size and time difference you can easily calculate the data transfer rate in MB/sec.

You would have to call these scripts specifying the name of the file to copy (e.g. IAM-100-MB) as the first argument. For example if you create a file of size 250 MB you would have to type the following in a command prompt:

Code: [Select]
C:
cd \TEST
mkfile -l 250
forward IAM-250-MB
backward IAM-250-MB

If you want you can post the results here for further evaluation.

For comparison you can also repeat these copy tests using an IPv4 connection between PC1 and PC2. If the IPv4 address of PC2 is assumed to be 192.168.0.2, you would have to type the following commands inside a command prompt at PC1:

Code: [Select]
net use Z: /delete
net use Z: \\192.168.0.2\share2

(... again entering user and password if needed).

Now you have an IPv4 connection between PC1 and PC2 and you could repeat the copy tests as described above. They should be much faster now if my theory is correct that DAP-1525 has problems with bridging of IPv6 packets.

PT

EDIT:

Before you do all this first of all it might be helpful to show us your IP/IPv6 configuration of the PCs I called PC1 and PC2 above. To do so at each of these PCs open a command prompt and enter the command ipconfig /all. You can mark the output text of this command with your mouse, then copy it by pressing ENTER and then paste it here via CTRL+V. If this doesn't work you first have to activate "Quick Edit Mode" in the properties of an open command prompt (click on the command prompt symbol residing on the left top corner of an open command prompt, then select "Default values", then select options tab and activate Quick Edit mode - close and reopen the command prompt to activate the new settings)
« Last Edit: May 14, 2014, 03:42:44 AM by PacketTracer »
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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #36 on: May 11, 2014, 11:45:15 AM »

There shouldn't be any issues between cross continent TV remote usage. As long and each user is using same Build version, remote access should work. I have connected with users many times across the pond  with out issues.

Thanks for all the help and info. Hope this can be figured out.

D-Link is reviewing this as well.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2014, 01:46:49 PM by FurryNutz »
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PacketTracer

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2014, 02:00:08 AM »

Hi,

I think the IPv6 bridging function DAP-1525 has to perform is theoretically described via RFC4389 (ND Proxy). In this RFC SCENARIO 1: Wireless Upstream fits the scenario we are discussing here. Maybe D-Link's implementation of this RFC within the present firmware of DAP-1525 may contain flaws.

Of course we can't prove this directly. If IPv6 configuration (of PCs on both sides of DAP-1525) is correct (which still has to be checked by inspection of "ipconfig /all" outputs of PC1 and PC2 above) a significant velocitiy difference (to be measured e.g. via the file transfer scenarios I described above) between bridged IPv4 and IPv6 streams cannot be nothing more than a hint to implementation flaws.

PT
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PacketTracer

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #38 on: May 18, 2014, 06:34:13 AM »

Hi all,

here is where we are now as a result of exchanging private messages:

So far we only have inspected the IPv6 configuration of both PC1 (directly connected to the router) and PC2 (sitting behind/wired to the DAP-1525). As far as I could see there hasn't been any peculiarities except that Teredo was active (which we switched off via "netsh int teredo set state disabled") which however had no influence on the problem:

Both PCs have a fixed and a temporary IPv6 address out of the Comcast IPv6 range 2601::/28, both autoconfigured via SLAAC from the same subrange 2601:9:xxxx:yyyy::/64 which is the prefix advertised by the Arris TG862 router. You can see this by inspecting the IPv6 default gateway which is the same at PC1 and PC2 and is the link local address of the router resulting from its MAC address starting with "5c-57-1a" which is a "MA-L" (formerly known as "OUI" - Organizationally Unique Identifier) of the manufacturer "ARRIS Group, Inc.", see IEEE MA-L registry). Both PCs use the same two Comcast IPv6 DNS servers 2001:558:feed::1 and 2001:558:feed::1 probably deployed via stateless DHCPv6 with Arris TG862 router operating as a stateless DHCPv6 server without being a DNS forwarder.

This means:

The interactions between both PCs (irrespective of their position in front of or behind DAP-1525) and the router with regard to autoconfiguration (forming IPv6 addresses and finding the default gateway via SLAAC, getting DNS server addresses via stateless DHCPv6) work as expected and result in consistent IPv6 configurations on both PC1 and PC2.

Now waiting for results about measured data rate discrepancies between IPv6 and IPv4 data streams between PC1 and PC2 ...

PT

Hi dk2463,

after having created a network share at PC2 and a network drive Z being mapped to this share at PC1 (according to my last PM) I'd expect you to provide something like the following executed at PC1 (one time for an IPv6 connection between PC1 and PC2 and again for an IPv4 connection for data rate/performance comparison):

Code: [Select]
C:\>cd \TEST

C:\TEST>mkfile -l 100

   Creating "IAM-100-MB" [100 MB] ...
   --> DONE!

C:\TEST>forward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:16:52,44
Copying file IAM-100-MB Local --> Remote. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:17:05,47

C:\TEST>backward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:17:11,35
Copying file IAM-100-MB Remote --> Local. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:17:28,07

C:\TEST>forward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:17:31,06
Copying file IAM-100-MB Local --> Remote. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:17:46,08

C:\TEST>backward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:17:51,50
Copying file IAM-100-MB Remote --> Local. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:08,33

C:\TEST>forward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:09,53
Copying file IAM-100-MB Local --> Remote. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:22,81

C:\TEST>backward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:24,61
Copying file IAM-100-MB Remote --> Local. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:41,48

C:\TEST>forward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:42,58
Copying file IAM-100-MB Local --> Remote. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:56,41

C:\TEST>backward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:18:57,42
Copying file IAM-100-MB Remote --> Local. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:19:14,45

C:\TEST>forward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:19:15,56
Copying file IAM-100-MB Local --> Remote. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:19:29,47

C:\TEST>backward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:19:31,13
Copying file IAM-100-MB Remote --> Local. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:19:47,73

C:\TEST>forward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:19:48,98
Copying file IAM-100-MB Local --> Remote. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:20:03,46

C:\TEST>backward IAM-100-MB
Start of copy: 18.05.2014 14:20:04,51
Copying file IAM-100-MB Remote --> Local. Please wait ...
End of copy: 18.05.2014 14:20:21,03

C:\TEST>

Simultaneously (and optionally) you can see what happens in task manager (given you activated the different views for sent and received bytes):



PT
« Last Edit: May 18, 2014, 11:14:21 AM by PacketTracer »
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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #39 on: May 19, 2014, 07:41:02 AM »

Thank you PT for keeping us up to date.

Please post your test results here. I'll keep bugging my contact at D-Link pass along any information about this.


Thanks guys.

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PacketTracer

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2014, 09:15:00 AM »

Hi all,

while still waiting for more details I asked dk2463 to provide via personal messages I'd like to discuss some more theoretical things here. While thinking about the problem discussed in this thread I tried to get some more insight into bridging which is the central topic here.

So I asked myself: Is there any difference between the bridging process a WLAN router (here the Arris TG862) performs between its wired ethernet ports and the WLAN defined by its built in WLAN access point and the bridging process the DAP-1525 performs between the WLAN and its wired ethernet ports? Do they both do so called "transparent MAC bridging" as defined by IEEE802.1D?

Transparent MAC bridging is agnostic toward the layer 3 protocol packet (IPv4 or IPv6) encapsulated inside the layer 2 frame being bridged, hence there shouldn't be any difference related to the data rates of bridged IPv6 and IPv4 data streams which is in contrast to the results discussed in this thread.

One demand for transparent MAC bridging is that any bridge port has to operate in so called promiscuous mode. While this is not explicitly true for the built in access point of a WLAN router, from the definition of an access point operating in so called Master Mode I would draw the conclusion that this function is enough to fulfil the demands for transparent MAC bridging as the access point is able to see all communication with WLAN clients that are associated with it in managed mode.

On the other hand the WLAN interface of the DAP-1525 operates as a WLAN client in the scenario discussed here, which means it is in managed mode where it can communicate with its associated master (the access point) only. This is far from being in or operating equivalent to promiscuous mode, which would mean that DAP-1525 cannot do transparent MAC bridging. At least this is my understanding so far. Anyone here willing to comment this?

If a bridge can't do transparent MAC bridging as is the case when a bridge interface cannot be operated in promiscuous mode (assumed to be true for the WLAN interface of the DAP-1525 in the scenario discussed here) protocol specific support is needed in order to do bridging nonetheless. For IPv4 this means that Proxy ARP has to be used, and for IPv6 this means that ND proxy function has to be used as defined by RFC4389, where the scenario discussed here is explicitly mentioned as SCENARIO 1:  Wireless Upstream.

If these considerations are true, they could explain that with protocol specific methods like Proxy ARP (IPv4) and ND Proxy (IPv6) protocol specific differences (like different data rates for IPv4 and IPv6 data streams as observed here) might occur if one of both methods is poorly or not at all implemented in the bridging device. And that's what I assume to be true for ND Proxy function in DAP-1525.

To be sure that or figure out if DAP-1525 uses Proxy ARP and/or ND Proxy I asked dk2463 to do some ping and ping6 commands at PC1 and PC2 (ping the router and each other) and then send me the ARP and IPv6 Neighbor caches of both PCs (as seen via the commands arp -a and netsh int ipv6 show nei respectively). If Proxy ARP and ND Proxy have a finger in the pie you can see this because then the IP or IPv6 address of any device sitting beyond the DAP-1525 (as seen from the local pinging device) is always resolved to the MAC address of the DAP-1525 itself instead of the real device's MAC address.

Any comments on these considerations are welcome.

In the moment I can do nothing more than waiting for results from dk2463 ...  ???

PT

EDIT:

In the DAP-1525 manual (download) you can find the following paragraph within the section that describes the Configuation for Bridge Mode (page 43 ff.):

Page 49:

Quote
Wireless MAC Cloning
Enabling this option allows the user to manually assign the
source MAC address to packets forwarded by the DAP-1525. If
not manually assigned, the packetís source MAC address field
will be automatically selected as the DAP-1525ís MAC address.

This clearly states that a DAP-1525, while operating in Bridge Mode, is a proxy that replaces the source MAC addresses of forwarded packets (by its own MAC address as a default, where the user interface offers the option to specify another value instead). More than that with regard to ND Proxy for IPv6 it should also replace link layer addresses inside some ND packets by its own MAC address as specified in RFC4389.

Considering the forwarding of IPv6 unicast packets, RFC4389 says:

Quote
When any other IPv6 unicast packet is received on a proxy interface,
if it is not locally destined then it is forwarded unchanged (other
than using a new link-layer header) to the proxy interface for which
the next hop address appears in the neighbor cache.

With regard to the scenario discussed here this means that the neighbor cache of DAP-1525's WLAN interface must contain the "next hop address" for any unicast IPv6 packet sent from wired clients behind DAP-1525 to the Internet. Of course in our scenario this "next hop address" is the link local address of the Arris TG862 router which is the default gateway for Internet access.

Furthermore this means that DAP-1525 must have an IPv6 default gateway configuration which it should have learned automatically from Arris TG862 router's router advertisements (RA) even if DAP-1525 is not explicitly configured for IPv6 as is the case with its default setting Link-local Only selected for IPv6 CONNECTION TYPE. But maybe this is not true due to implementation flaws.

Hence, @dk2463:

I would recommend to change the DAP-1525 settings for IPv6 CONNECTION TYPE to Autoconfiguration(Stateless/DHCPv6) (see page 52 of the manual). Could you please do so and tell us if this has any positive effects?

PT
« Last Edit: September 01, 2014, 10:53:10 AM by PacketTracer »
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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #41 on: May 27, 2014, 01:11:12 PM »

PT, thanks for the detailed information...I'll pass this along to D-Link and see if they can provide some info.

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Cable: 1Gb/50Mb>NetGear CM1200>DIR-882>HP 24pt Gb Switch. COVR-1202/2202/3902,DIR-2660/80,3xDGL-4500s,DIR-LX1870,857,835,827,815,890L,880L,868L,836L,810L,685,657,3x655s,645,628,601,DNR-202L,DNS-345,DCS-933L,936L,960L and 8000LH.

FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #42 on: June 05, 2014, 01:49:22 PM »

Any status on this DK?  ???

Have the 1525 in Bridge mode with hard wire to my PC. When  I run a speed test, the IPv4 gets around 50Mbps download and 11Mbps up. When the IPv6 test runes, download is around .57Mbps and up about the same.

When attempting to reach an IPv6 site like Yahoo.com, it takes at least 1 minute for the page to load.

Why is IPv6 so slow?
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Cable: 1Gb/50Mb>NetGear CM1200>DIR-882>HP 24pt Gb Switch. COVR-1202/2202/3902,DIR-2660/80,3xDGL-4500s,DIR-LX1870,857,835,827,815,890L,880L,868L,836L,810L,685,657,3x655s,645,628,601,DNR-202L,DNS-345,DCS-933L,936L,960L and 8000LH.

PacketTracer

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #43 on: June 05, 2014, 02:39:58 PM »

Looks like dk2463 isn't interested any more.
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FurryNutz

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Re: Very slow speeds on IPv6
« Reply #44 on: June 25, 2014, 10:14:48 AM »

It would be nice if the OP posted on what he's found or if he's just moved on.  ???
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Cable: 1Gb/50Mb>NetGear CM1200>DIR-882>HP 24pt Gb Switch. COVR-1202/2202/3902,DIR-2660/80,3xDGL-4500s,DIR-LX1870,857,835,827,815,890L,880L,868L,836L,810L,685,657,3x655s,645,628,601,DNR-202L,DNS-345,DCS-933L,936L,960L and 8000LH.
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