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Author Topic: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding  (Read 6065 times)

spectreracing

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Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« on: January 31, 2011, 11:01:03 PM »

Hello, I'm having major problems while playing online ( Call of Duty: Black Ops) on my PS3. I've tried everything and every combination I can think of to forward ports on my router. In the Logs section in the router, this message comes up ALOT: Blocked outgoing ICMP packet (ICMP type 3) from 192.168.0.193 to 189.189.41.136. What is causing this problem?
I've tried putting my PS3 into DMZ mode, Static IP, Gaming rule, Gamefuel Rule, Virtual Server, ect. I'm close to throwing this router out the door because it says it's doing something that it's actually not. I'm very impressed with this router with everything BUT gaming. I'm running on MAC OSX 10.6.6,DGL-4500 with the latest firmware, and the Motorola SURFboard SB6120 cable modem, my internet provider is Comcast. I've ran scans on multiple port checking sites and all are showing closed/could not ping router/ip address. I've also used my Macs Network Utility to check/ping ports, but to no avail. Does anyone have ANY suggestion as to what the problem is, and what I can do to fix it? thanks in Advance!

-spectre
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FurryNutz

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2011, 07:39:09 AM »

You need to review the gameing and gamefuel sticky for PS on this board. They work well and should clear up your set up issue. You don't need to use gaming or port forwarding. You'll be using the Gamefuel option to get your PS setup and going. It's all documented. Make sure you set up a static IP reservation.

I also have the SB 6120, 4500 and have multiple game consoles and a Mac Book Pro. You'll be fine.
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Cable: 1Gb/50Mb>NetGear CM1200>DIR-882>HP 24pt Gb Switch. COVR-1202/2202/3902,DIR-2660/80,3xDGL-4500s,DIR-LX1870,857,835,827,815,890L,880L,868L,836L,810L,685,657,3x655s,645,628,601,DNR-202L,DNS-345,DCS-933L,936L,960L and 8000LH.

zariaman

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2011, 06:12:03 AM »

Quick question that popped in my head and I can't find the answer.
 If you add a gaming rule to your Xbox/PS3 IP address and also enable it in the DMZ does it effect the routing in any way; what actually happens?
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FurryNutz

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2011, 07:18:23 AM »

Any device you put in the DMZ doe not take advantage of any of the features of the router.
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Cable: 1Gb/50Mb>NetGear CM1200>DIR-882>HP 24pt Gb Switch. COVR-1202/2202/3902,DIR-2660/80,3xDGL-4500s,DIR-LX1870,857,835,827,815,890L,880L,868L,836L,810L,685,657,3x655s,645,628,601,DNR-202L,DNS-345,DCS-933L,936L,960L and 8000LH.

zariaman

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 11:57:33 AM »

Any device you put in the DMZ doe not take advantage of any of the features of the router.

Thanks you for this info!. 

So you mean if I have my xbox all setup with GameFuel enabled and  added GameFuel Rules; putting its IP on the DMZ completely negates these settings for the IP?
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FurryNutz

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2011, 12:04:00 PM »

Yes it does.

DMZ Host

DMZ means "Demilitarized Zone." If an application has trouble working from behind the router, you can expose one computer to the Internet and run the application on that computer.

When a LAN host is configured as a DMZ host, it becomes the destination for all incoming packets that do not match some other incoming session or rule. If any other ingress rule is in place, that will be used instead of sending packets to the DMZ host; so, an active session, virtual server, active port trigger, or Gaming rule will take priority over sending a packet to the DMZ host. (The DMZ policy resembles a default Gaming rule that forwards every port that is not specifically sent anywhere else.)

The router provides only limited firewall protection for the DMZ host. The router does not forward a TCP packet that does not match an active DMZ session, unless it is a connection establishment packet (SYN). Except for this limited protection, the DMZ host is effectively "outside the firewall". Anyone considering using a DMZ host should also consider running a firewall on that DMZ host system to provide additional protection.

Packets received by the DMZ host have their IP addresses translated from the WAN-side IP address of the router to the LAN-side IP address of the DMZ host. However, port numbers are not translated; so applications on the DMZ host can depend on specific port numbers.

The DMZ capability is just one of several means for allowing incoming requests that might appear unsolicited to the NAT. In general, the DMZ host should be used only if there are no other alternatives, because it is much more exposed to cyberattacks than any other system on the LAN. Thought should be given to using other configurations instead: a virtual server, a Gaming rule, or a port trigger. Virtual servers open one port for incoming sessions bound for a specific application (and also allow port redirection and the use of ALGs). Gaming is rather like a selective DMZ, where incoming traffic targeted at one or more ports is forwarded to a specific LAN host (thereby not exposing as many ports as a DMZ host). Port triggering is a special form of Gaming, which is activated by outgoing traffic, and for which ports are only forwarded while the trigger is active.

Few applications truly require the use of the DMZ host. Following are examples of when a DMZ host might be required:
A host needs to support several applications that might use overlapping ingress ports such that two Gaming rules cannot be used because they would potentially be in conflict.
To handle incoming connections that use a protocol other than ICMP, TCP, UDP, and IGMP (also GRE and ESP, when these protocols are enabled by the PPTP and IPSec ALGs ).
« Last Edit: February 08, 2011, 12:06:15 PM by FurryNutz »
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Cable: 1Gb/50Mb>NetGear CM1200>DIR-882>HP 24pt Gb Switch. COVR-1202/2202/3902,DIR-2660/80,3xDGL-4500s,DIR-LX1870,857,835,827,815,890L,880L,868L,836L,810L,685,657,3x655s,645,628,601,DNR-202L,DNS-345,DCS-933L,936L,960L and 8000LH.

zariaman

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2011, 06:08:33 AM »

Great info about the DMZ host.  I have two xboxs, I took my main Xbox's static/reserved IP off the DMZ and  just disabled the DMZ option.  I believe now I am taking advantage of the Game Fuel options which I have configured for both consoles. There are times when my wife is watching Netfix on one xbox and I am gaming on the other so I should see some improvements in the traffic on the gaming xbox if I have it set at a higher priority.

From what I understand the router DMZ host is not like a DMZ of an organization, it is not a separate subnetwork that is kept separate to prevent attacks to the internal network.  The DGL-4500 DMZ host does not separate your internal network it basically just exposes all your ports of that specific IP allowing for cyber attacks into your network.

That being said, if I had no other traffic on my network except for one xbox console would I be gaining or losing anything from placing the IP of the xbox on the DMZ?  I have been searching online for anyone that has any experience with attacks on xboxs on the DMZ and I have not been able to find any threats.  
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FurryNutz

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2011, 07:11:51 AM »

You would not be gaining any thing. The only thing you would be loosing the the functionality and features of this router. I haven't personally heard of any attacks on the xbox as of yet. You never know though.
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xco

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011, 02:51:25 PM »

the problem is not your router port forward but may be your modem port forwarding, supposing you forwarded your routers ports correctly. So you need to connect directly to your modem or find out how to get into its GUI and open up your ports at the MODEM level. that should do it
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Hard Harry

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Re: Need help, 4500 not port forwarding
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2011, 06:11:32 PM »

Thats only a issue with people who have modem/router gateways. This is common with people using DSL. 6120 doesn't have such worries. The only thing you have to worry about is if you have any routers in the 192.168.100.xx range, since technically it has a DHCP server, but is almost never used. Bypassing the router is a good idea though, it will isolate the problem. After all, it could still be at the OS level.
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